WHERE DOES THE MONEY GO?

STOPPING CANCER CELLS’ PRO-SURVIVAL MECHANISMS IN TRIPLE-NEGATIVE BREAST CANCER

2019 - 2020

INSTITUTION:

CHIEF RESEARCHER:

The University of Sydney

Dr. Sumit Sahni

Development of novel therapy targeting autophagy against Triple-Negative Breast Cancers (TNBCs).

TNBC accounts for 15-20% of all breast cancers and is more common in young women. It can be more likely to spread and hard to treat. TNBC cells lack the three receptors - oestrogen, progesterone and HER2 - and so many of the standard therapies which target one of these receptors will not work. TNBCs are also highly likely to develop resistance to chemotherapy. Cancer cells can experience highly stressful conditions as a result of treatment with chemotherapeutic drugs and in order to escape the effects of treatment, cancer cells use a pro-survival pathway, known as autophagy. This can help cancer cells to grow and spread. Dr. Sumit Sahni will test new drugs to block autophagy, which he hopes will stop the growth and spread of TNBC and re-sensitise the cancer to anti-cancer drugs. Donated tissue samples will be used to learn more about the role of autophagy. Dr. Sahni is excited to bring his expertise in pancreatic cancer to the fight against breast cancer.

The University of Sydney
The University of Sydney
STOPPING CANCER CELLS’ PRO-SURVIVAL MECHANISMS IN TRIPLE-NEGATIVE BREAST CANCER